A Treasure Trove of Vaishnava Literature

By: Mayapur Communications for ISKCON News on July 20, 2018

A composition show at the Bhaktivedanta Research focus.

In South Kolkata, a fortune trove of Vaishnava writing can be found in ISKCON Mayapur’s Bhaktivedanta Research Center. This library is a diamond covered up in a peaceful Kolkata neighborhood, in which can be discovered duplicates of relatively every book composed by the past acharyasgoing back to Srila Rupa Gosvami, and numerous uncommon and no longer in production books, for example, Srila Bhaktivinoda Thakura’s aggregation of discourses on the Padma Purana and his critiques on the Bhagavad-gita. The library likewise contains outputs of numerous unique, written by hand compositions, and also a considerable lot of the first original copies themselves, for example, the main known duplicate of Srila Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati Thakura’s own journal, dating from 1904 – 1906. Hare Krishna Books

The Bhaktivedanta Research Center was set up to satisfy a few of Srila Prabhupada’s guidelines: In 1972, Srila Prabhupadainstructed that film records be made of the first compositions of Srila Bhaktivinoda Thakuraso that these important original copies could be protected.

In 1976 in Bombay, Srila Prabhupada educated his sanctuary administrators to build a top of the line library with the majority of his own books, the books of the past acharyas, and every one of the Vedas. He said that researchers ought to have the capacity to come and concentrate our rationality profoundly and progress toward becoming enthusiasts. Krishna Store

.Furthermore, Srila Prabhupada gave numerous directions about the Temple of the Vedic Planetarium and how its introduction of Vedic cosmology as per the Srimad-Bhagavatam would counter the hypotheses of contemporary researchers. The thoughts that will be displayed in the Temple of the Vedic Planetarium will without a doubt be tested, and an exploration focus and library of Vedic cosmology is important to supplement and bolster the development of the Temple of the Vedic Planetarium’s interplanetary crystal fixture.

In 2008, it was in view of this that Hari-sauri dasa, the organizer of the Temple of the Vedic Planetarium’s cosmology group, and Pranava dasa, who was at the time doing his doctoral research, arranged the opening of a Vaishnavastudy focus. This harmonized with the chance to get an essential gathering of books, an accumulation which dated back to Srila Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati Thakura’s living arrangement in the Bagh Bazaar sanctuary in the 1930s. The gathering had been held by Sri SundaranandaVidyavinoda, a main Gaudiya Math part and previous secretary of Srila Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati Thakura, since 1937. Radha Krishna Store

A building that had been given to ISKCON in Kolkata was assigned by ISKCON Mayapurto be utilized for this library, and assets were masterminded with the goal that the building could be redesigned and transformed into an appropriate present day library. In June of 2009, the Bhaktivedanta Research Center formally opened. Hare Krishna Store

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ISKCON Teachers Get Much-Needed Support at fifth Education Conference

Instructors at ISKCON’s schools work hard, regularly with little help – so the opportunity to interface and team up with kindred teachers from all finished North America at the fifth yearly ISKCON Education Conference was a gift.

Running from Thursday June 21st to Sunday June 24th, the occasion occurred at the Bhaktivedanta Academy Montessori school in Alachua, Florida. It was sorted out by Bhaktivedanta Academy chief Visvambhara Das, with assistance from Hanumatpresaka Swami and Dallas’ TKG Academy bad habit main Gopi Gita Dasi. Hare Krishna Books Store

Twenty-three teachers took an interest face to face, from ISKCON schools in Dallas, Houston, Alachua, and North Carolina. A bunch more from Sunday Schools in Baltimore, New Jersey, Detroit and ISKCON Silicon Valley took an interest online through Google Hangouts

The fundamental objective of the meeting was to complete and change an arrangement of gauges for all ISKCON schools and Sunday schools in North America to hold fast to.

This would get them embraced by the ISKCON Ministry of Education as official ISKCON-partnered schools, which would in the long run observe the Ministry giving educator preparing, kid insurance assets and even monetary help.

Inside this fundamental theme, teachers spent a few hours talking about kid insurance and how to bring schools acros ISKCON North America up to the fitting gauges. Hare Krishna Books

They likewise discussed being lined up with Srila Prabhupada; what distinctive difficulties they looked over the span of their administration; and what assets are accessible for them to tackle those difficulties.

“The meeting was extremely community,” says Gopi Gita. “In one session we shared regions where we required help, and territories where we could give bolster. Promptly we could see that even just with everybody in the room right at that point, we had the assets accessible to help settle the issues we were confronting.”

A last accomplishment of the meeting was the formation of I-SENA (ISKCON School Educators of North America), a shut online gathering on Facebook and Google Drive where teachers can share assets, difficulties and triumphs.  Radha Krishna Deities

Looking to the future, Gopi Gita trusts that the Conference can help ISKCON eudcators feel that they are upheld and their administration is esteemed – something she says has unfortunately been missing.

“I trust our subsequent stage will be to interface with sanctuary presidents and advise them that tending to our kids through these instructive activities ought to be at the highest point of their needs list,” she says. “What’s more, that giving instructors a voice and a place to swing to when they’re encountering difficulties will reinforce them, which will thus enable our youngsters to feel significantly more agreeable and ensured.”

One year from now, Gopi Gita exepcts twofold the quantity of members at the Conference.

“This was the most enabling and energizing meeting that I’ve been to out of each of the five up until now,” Gopi Gita says. “To work with kindred instructors crosswise over ISKCON; to finish support models in shared settings; to recognize assets and battles in numerous territories; to learn so much and feel so associated with dear companions; to have the capacity to help assemble it; was an aggregate dream materialize. So in case you’re an ISKCON teacher, if you don’t mind go to our next Education Conference in 2019 to feel totally restored!”

Ajit Singh Has Lost Forever,’ Says Uma Bharti Amid Buzz On UP Alliance

Himachal’s Dharamsala again gets Smart City tag

Dharamsala, the hill station in Himachal Pradesh that has lured hundreds of thousands of Westerners since Tibetan spiritual leader Dalai Lama settled here, was on Tuesday again included in the central government’s list of Smart Cities.

Union Urban Development Minister M. Venkaiah Naidu announced in New Delhi the 13 winners of the Fast Track Smart Cities competition.

They are Lucknow, Warangal, Dharamsala, Chandigarh, Raipur, New Town Kolkata, Bhagalpur, Panaji, Port Blair, Imphal, Ranchi, Agartala and Faridabad.

 

Source: ET

ISKCON 50 Meditations: April 26, 2016

How difficult it was becoming to preach in America among these crazy people!  He had written prophetically in his poem the day he had arrived in Boston Harbor, “My dear Lord, I do not know why You have brought me here.  Now You can do with me whatever You like.  But I guess You have some business here, otherwise why would You bring me to this terrible place?”  What about his scheduled classes?  What about David – should he go back and try to talk with the boy?  This had been David’s first fit of violence, but there had been other tense moments.  David had a habit of leaving the soap on the floor of the shower stall and Prabhupada had asked him not to because it was a hazard.  But David wouldn’t listen.  Prabhupada had continued to remind him, and one day David had gotten angry and shouted at him.  But there was no real enmity.  Even today’s incident had not been a matter of personal differences – the boy was a victim.

Prabhupada walked quickly.  He had free passage on the Scindia Line.  He could go home to Vrindavana.  But his spiritual master had ordered him to come here.  “By the strong desire of Sri Srimad Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati Thakura,” he had written while crossing the Atlantic, “the holy name of Lord Gauranga will spread throughout the countries of the Western world.”  Before nightfall he would have to find some place to stay, a way to keep up the momentum of his preaching.  This is what it meant to be working without government sponsorship, without the support of any religious organization, without a patron.  It meant being vulnerable and insecure.  Prabhupada faced the crisis as a test from Krishna.  The instruction of  Bhagavad-gita was to depend on Krishna for protection: “In all activities just depend upon Me and work always under My protection.  In such devotional service be fully conscious of Me … You will pass over all the obstacles of conditional life by My grace.”

He decided to phone Carl Yeargens and ask him to help.  Hearing the Swami’s voice on the phone – it was an emergency! – Carl at once agreed that Prabhupada could move in with him and his wife, Eva.  Their place was close by, on Centre Street, five blocks west of Bowery near Chinatown.  Carl would be right over.

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ISKCON 50 Meditations: April 24, 2016

If Krishna consciousness was ever to take hold in America, it would have to be without assistance from the Indian government or Indian financiers.  Not even a lone Indianbrahmacari would join him.  Krishna was revealing His plan to Prabhupada in a different way.  With the Singhania-sanction schemes finished and behind him, Prabhupada would turn all his energy toward the young men and women coming to him in his Bowery loft.  He wrote to Sumati Morarji:

I am now trying to incorporate one corporation of the local friends and admirers under the name International Society for Krishna Conscious.

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ISKCON 50 Meditations: April 13, 2016

New people began coming to see Prabhupada on the Bowery.  Carl Yeargens, a thirty-three year-old, black, bearded man from the Bronx had attended Cornell University and was now independently studying Indian religion and Zen Buddhism.  He had experimented with drugs as “psychedelic tools” and he had an interest in the music and poetry of India.  He was influential among his friends and tried to interest them in meditation.  He had even been dabbling in Sanskrit.

Carl:  I had just finished reading a book called The Wonder That Was India.  I had gotten the definition of a sannyasi and a brahmacari and so forth.  There was a vivid description in that particular book of how you could see a sannyasicoming down the road with his saffron robe.  It must have made more than a superficial impression on me, because it came to me on this one chilly evening.  I was going to visit Michael Grant – probably going to smoke some marijuana and sit around, maybe play some music – and I was coming down Hester Street.  If you make a left on the Bowery, you can go up to Mike’s place on Grand Street.  But it’s a funny thing that I chose to go that way, because the shorter way would have been to go down Grand Street.  But if I had gone that way, I probably would have missed Swamiji. 

So I decided to go down Hester and make a left.  All of a sudden I saw in this dingy alcove, a brilliant saffron robe.  As I passed, I saw it was Swamiji knocking on the door, trying to gain entrance.  There were two bums hunched up against the door.  It was like a two-part door – one of them was sealed and the other was locked.  The two bums were lying on either side of Swamiji.  One of these men had actually expired – which often happened and you had to call the police or health department to get them. 

I don’t think I saw the men lying in the doorway until I walked up to Swamiji and asked him, “Are you a sannyasi?”  And he answered, “Yes.”  We started this conversation about how he was starting a temple, and he mentioned Lord Caitanya and the whole thing.  He just came out with this flow of strange things to me, right there in the street.  But I knew what he was talking about somehow.  I had the familiarity of having just read this book and delved into Indian religion.  So I knew that this was a momentous occasion for me and I wanted to help him.  We banged on the door and eventually we got into the loft.  He invited me to come to a kirtana, and I came back later that night for my first kirtana.  From that point on, it was a fairly regular thing – three times a week.  At one point Swamiji asked me to stay with him, and I stayed for about two weeks.

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Devotees from 106 countries practice yoga to mark ISKCON 50th anniversary

Devotees from 106 countries practised bhakti yoga together at the Kshudiram Anushilan Kendra here, creating a record for “Most Nationalities in a yoga lesson” with the Guinness World Records, while another 105 devotees sang Bengali choir to set the record, ISKCON vice-president V N Das claimed.

“Inspired by the fact that in June India created a world record in New Delhi for most number of people participating in a yoga lesson, we today decided to make yoga more popular around the world by creating another record for the Guinness World Records. And today we are happy to say that we have successfully done it,” Das told PTI.

The three-day celebrations, which started here today would be observed across the globe along with the ‘Journey to West’ of its founder Acharya A C Bhaktivedanta Swami Shrila Prabhupada.
West Bengal Governor K N Tripathi and other distinguished personalities from different fields were present at ISKCON’s cultural programmes, as part of its celebrations held at the Netaji Indoor stadium here today.

It was from this city that Prabhupada left India on his historic journey to the West at the age of 69 on August 13, 1965 to preach the message of God Krishna to the world.

In 2016, events would be launched around the world to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Prabhupada’s founding of the ISKCON, in New York City, on July, 13, 1966.

Every day at 2 p.m., Antonio Davila rolls the metal shutters down over the front of his computer repair shop in central Madrid. He heads home for lunch, picks up his kids at school — and then goes back to work from 5 to 9 p.m. He’s originally from Peru, and says Spanish hours took some getting used to. “The sun sets later here, and that affects people’s habits,” Davila says. “I open my shop around 10:30 a.m., close in the afternoon, and then stay open later at night.” His schedule is typical for most small retailers in Spain, where the sun does set later — ever since the military dictator Francisco Franco moved the clocks ahead one hour, to put the country on Central European Time, during World War II, in solidarity with Nazi Germany. And the mid-afternoon break made sense when Spain was mostly agricultural, and it was too hot to work outdoors. But last weekend, acting Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy said it’s time for a change. “I will find a consensus to make sure the working day ends at 6 p.m.,” Rajoy said told a party conference Saturday in Seville. He proposed scrapping the mid-afternoon break, and changing Spain’s time zone back to match that of Britain, Portugal and Morocco, countries on roughly the same longitude. Rajoy’s speech barely made news inside Spain. Spanish lawmakers have debated the idea before. In 2013, a parliamentary committee approved a proposal to change Spanish clocks back one hour. But the full legislature never agreed. Spaniards Annoyed At Foreign Coverage Foreign media, however, have made much of Rajoy’s speech. U.S. and British headlines say “Adios, Siesta!” or “Time to Wake Up!” — alongside stock photos of fat men snoozing, or even bullfighters sleeping on benches. “A big fat lazy slob sleeping a siesta! It’s an offensive image — but it’s an image people outside of Spain have of Spain,” says Matthew Bennett, editor of the website The Spain Report. “It’s a stereotype of Spain, along with bulls and flamenco and tortilla and sangria — like the English and rain and umbrellas and bowler hats. There’s no way of getting rid of these historical stereotypes — but they do grate with Spaniards, because they work very hard.” Spaniards typically work longer hours, and sleep less, on average, than other Europeans. While Rajoy’s initial speech grabbed few headlines at home, the foreign media’s subsequent coverage of it did. “British headlines say Rajoy wants to scrap 3-hour naps,” wrote Spain’s conservative ABC daily. “The international press quips: Rajoy wants to scrap the siesta,” was the headline on El País, Spain’s leading newspaper. Bennett says he’s been fielding calls all week from foreign journalists asking him to explain the importance of the siesta to Spaniards. But he says most Spaniards simply don’t take one. They run errands, have lunch or work straight through their mid-afternoon break, but are still expected to work late too, and thus don’t get home until 8 or 9 p.m. “Everybody kind of idealizes European working hours, and [they] say, ‘My goodness, if we finished at five or six [o’clock], we could have like three hours off every evening to do other stuff that’s not work,'” he says. Stuff like fighting bulls, dancing flamenco or drinking sangria on the beach — or so the stereotype goes. Working Long Hours “I guess there is like an element of truth in all of this. Yes, there is flamenco in Spain. Yes, we used to have siestas, maybe more in rural areas to escape the heat,” says Yolanda Martín, a Spanish dance expert who gives flamenco-themed tours of Madrid, and runs a website dedicated to the art form. “But no longer, really. Most people I know never take siestas — or maybe only on a Saturday.” At 32, Martín is part of a Spanish generation that’s survived economic crisis, and is now working long hours — if its members have jobs at all — for less pay than in most other western European countries. But she says the stereotype of Spain — laid-back, or concerned more with fiestas than work — is something Spaniards themselves created, once upon a time. “In the 1950s and 60s, when the Franco regime was trying to attract tourists to Spain, they kind of sold this idea. ‘You want sun, you want beach? Come to Spain, you’re going to get all of that.’ We did kind of exploit that, and maybe it’s brought money, and it’s been good,” Martín says. “But at the same time, it can harm us. We’re not portrayed as a serious country. You know, we’re like lazy.” Polls show most Spaniards would prefer to work a nine-to-five schedule. But Rajoy, the acting prime minister, might not be the one to make the change. His conservatives lost their majority in elections late last year, and rival parties are in the process of negotiating a possible coalition government, to oust him. Rajoy could leave office this summer. And then he’d have plenty of time for siestas, even if he doesn’t seem to like them.

Washington: Indian Americans from across the country are mobilising support for the victims of the devastating earthquake in Nepal, with a large number of organisations raising funds for the people of the quake-ravaged country.
Organisations like Aim for Seva, BAPS Charities, ISKCON – Food for Life, India Development and Relief Fund (IDRF) and SEWA International are contributing in numerous ways — from providing recovery assistance and urgent medical care to healthy meals and temporary shelter, a media release said.

“This devastating earthquake was centred in Nepal’s Kathmandu valley whose effect was strongly felt deep inside India. Nearly 4,000 people are dead and counting. Several thousand people were displaced and lost everything,” Chandrakant Patel, president of Overseas Friends of BJP-USA, said urging Indian Americans to make generous contributions to the cause.

Another organisation, The United Sikhs said that their relief team has reached Nepal to carry out work in those areas where aid is most critically needed.

“Our medical team of doctors will arrive by Friday equipped with medical supplies to assist the injured,” added the US-based organisation.

American India Foundation said 100 per cent of its donations would go to the Nepal quake victims.

“This fund will support the rehabilitation of lost livelihoods for communities across Nepal, to rebuild and provide a new life filled with dignity, opportunity, and hope,” said M A Ravi Kumar, CEO of American India Foundation.

Every day at 2 p.m., Antonio Davila rolls the metal shutters down over the front of his computer repair shop in central Madrid. He heads home for lunch, picks up his kids at school — and then goes back to work from 5 to 9 p.m. He’s originally from Peru, and says Spanish hours took some getting used to. “The sun sets later here, and that affects people’s habits,” Davila says. “I open my shop around 10:30 a.m., close in the afternoon, and then stay open later at night.” His schedule is typical for most small retailers in Spain, where the sun does set later — ever since the military dictator Francisco Franco moved the clocks ahead one hour, to put the country on Central European Time, during World War II, in solidarity with Nazi Germany. And the mid-afternoon break made sense when Spain was mostly agricultural, and it was too hot to work outdoors. But last weekend, acting Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy said it’s time for a change. “I will find a consensus to make sure the working day ends at 6 p.m.,” Rajoy said told a party conference Saturday in Seville. He proposed scrapping the mid-afternoon break, and changing Spain’s time zone back to match that of Britain, Portugal and Morocco, countries on roughly the same longitude. Rajoy’s speech barely made news inside Spain. Spanish lawmakers have debated the idea before. In 2013, a parliamentary committee approved a proposal to change Spanish clocks back one hour. But the full legislature never agreed. Spaniards Annoyed At Foreign Coverage Foreign media, however, have made much of Rajoy’s speech. U.S. and British headlines say “Adios, Siesta!” or “Time to Wake Up!” — alongside stock photos of fat men snoozing, or even bullfighters sleeping on benches. “A big fat lazy slob sleeping a siesta! It’s an offensive image — but it’s an image people outside of Spain have of Spain,” says Matthew Bennett, editor of the website The Spain Report. “It’s a stereotype of Spain, along with bulls and flamenco and tortilla and sangria — like the English and rain and umbrellas and bowler hats. There’s no way of getting rid of these historical stereotypes — but they do grate with Spaniards, because they work very hard.” Spaniards typically work longer hours, and sleep less, on average, than other Europeans. While Rajoy’s initial speech grabbed few headlines at home, the foreign media’s subsequent coverage of it did. “British headlines say Rajoy wants to scrap 3-hour naps,” wrote Spain’s conservative ABC daily. “The international press quips: Rajoy wants to scrap the siesta,” was the headline on El País, Spain’s leading newspaper. Bennett says he’s been fielding calls all week from foreign journalists asking him to explain the importance of the siesta to Spaniards. But he says most Spaniards simply don’t take one. They run errands, have lunch or work straight through their mid-afternoon break, but are still expected to work late too, and thus don’t get home until 8 or 9 p.m. “Everybody kind of idealizes European working hours, and [they] say, ‘My goodness, if we finished at five or six [o’clock], we could have like three hours off every evening to do other stuff that’s not work,'” he says. Stuff like fighting bulls, dancing flamenco or drinking sangria on the beach — or so the stereotype goes. Working Long Hours “I guess there is like an element of truth in all of this. Yes, there is flamenco in Spain. Yes, we used to have siestas, maybe more in rural areas to escape the heat,” says Yolanda Martín, a Spanish dance expert who gives flamenco-themed tours of Madrid, and runs a website dedicated to the art form. “But no longer, really. Most people I know never take siestas — or maybe only on a Saturday.” At 32, Martín is part of a Spanish generation that’s survived economic crisis, and is now working long hours — if its members have jobs at all — for less pay than in most other western European countries. But she says the stereotype of Spain — laid-back, or concerned more with fiestas than work — is something Spaniards themselves created, once upon a time. “In the 1950s and 60s, when the Franco regime was trying to attract tourists to Spain, they kind of sold this idea. ‘You want sun, you want beach? Come to Spain, you’re going to get all of that.’ We did kind of exploit that, and maybe it’s brought money, and it’s been good,” Martín says. “But at the same time, it can harm us. We’re not portrayed as a serious country. You know, we’re like lazy.” Polls show most Spaniards would prefer to work a nine-to-five schedule. But Rajoy, the acting prime minister, might not be the one to make the change. His conservatives lost their majority in elections late last year, and rival parties are in the process of negotiating a possible coalition government, to oust him. Rajoy could leave office this summer. And then he’d have plenty of time for siestas, even if he doesn’t seem to like them.

Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Akhilesh Yadav has decided to felicitate Siddiqui for attaining first position in the written examination conducted to assess knowledge on Gita among children. She would be felicitated soon,” an official spokesman said.
It would give a good message of respecting all religions in the society, the spokesman said. Siddiqui, a sixth-grade student of Mumbai-based school, won the “Shrimad Bhagwad Gita Champion League” yesterday organised by ISKCON International Society beating around 4,500 students.